Krista's Coding Corner

10.06.2012

Offtopic: The dark side of coders?

Most of the jobs just seem to require tolerance in getting sh*t on you, not that you should be a better person. Ignorance easily seems to be the answer how to cope with demanding work life. I have seen many people who just wear off. At first they are enthusiastic, brilliant, positive and most of all: motivated. Then they grow up.

I don’t know what the ultimate answer to not growing up is. Naturally this kind of unwanted growing doesn’t happen in every job but some types of occupations are in high risk. Especially, if the job environment meets the right circumstances.

Mostly it seems that changing atmosphere (== job or just the task) is the key. Not always but it is an easy and quite accessible possibility.

Why to talk about this in here? Because it doesn’t only happen in work life but also in hobbies. Mostly hobbies are something people love to do and are like an escape route from everyday life. In coding it just can turn into something ugly. Let me show what I mean:

 

Source. Linked 10.06.2012.

 

Source. Linked 10.06.2012.

 

Source. Linked 10.06.2012.

 

And the classic:

Source. Linked 10.06.2012.

The last one reminds me: in one research, years ago, they said that women swear more compared to men in the army (sorry, couldn’t found it anywhere). They suspected that it was because it gave them more authority and power (which can be bit harder to gain because of gender issues). I have noticed the same phenomenon in some certain male populated, roughish, jobs. There might be many explanations into that (not to seclude that it still raises a surprisingly lot of attention if a women behaves in not-so-traditional manner). However, what I see in this is that we easily prefer using harsher language to gain status or underline something (and like Linus said: it gives often more attention). I admit to do that myself if I see that there is real need that someone should take a hint on my advice. Does it work? Not sure as it also can just annoy people. (at least I hate all-knowing-I’m-so-much-better-than-you -people).

And my point is? Don’t get depressed over what someone happens to say but also don’t just ignore all negative comments. The one giving them might actually have something on them even he probably should have said it more nicely… If you really are a great person, you will be able to listen to even unearned criticism. Because if you don’t listen to it, how can you know it wasn’t deserved?

If you look some reality shows you might see these “cat fights” (these shows are like caricatures of real world and some behavior patterns are more visible in these). What mostly happens in the fights is that someone involved thinks and tries to act like she is better than the other(s) who is(/are) picking a fight. As a viewer you might see that yes, she is right and the other is behaving like a berserk. But quite often the I’m-not-going-to-listen-your-stupidity isn’t actually a saint herself… My advice: try not to behave like that even it is the easy and seemingly high and mighty route away from the situation. Ignoring won't make things to go away.

It’s never nice to get nasty feedback but it might help to understand that unfortunately in the fields of coding there is a lot of frustration that might unravel also in totally wrong places.

PS. Some of the frustration comes from the fact that due to different restraints, one can’t do his thing as well as he would like. Many people involved in coding are also quite.. hhmm... perfectionist in that sense that they don’t like faults. They would prefer fixing them. And sometimes it may go way too far.

PPS. Try not to grow into cranky old geezers ;)

Commit log:

- 10.6.2012 Fixed typos + added some missing words to make the text more readable.

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